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Feb
8
Badgers and Pastures: A Habitat Management Workshop

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Join Nature Saskatchewan and our partners Prairie Conservation Action Plan, Saskatchewan Stock Growers Foundation and Sodcap Inc. for Badgers and Pastures: A Habitat Management Workshop.  This workshop is geared towards landholders and managers with hands-on activities and case studies. Workshop also includes snacks, coffee and supper!

 

Two dates and locations to pick from:

Val Marie, SK - February 27

Eastend, SK - February 28

 

Please RSVP in advance by emailing obo@naturesask.ca or by call/text to 306-780-9833

Feb
8
Saskatchewan’s Newest Nature Society forms at Moosomin

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On January 18, four members of the Indian Head Natural History Society (IHNHS) were invited to Moosomin to participate in the inaugural meeting of Saskatchewan's newest Nature Society, aptly named Gateway Nature. This newly minted group is ready to offer nature lovers in the South East part of the province with nature based learning tools and events. This inaugural meeting was well attended by Moosomin and area residents. 

The Gateway Nature group was initiated and chaired by local Moosomin resident Kendra Parrish, who is an avid nature lover and enthusiastic and supportive citizen scientist in that area. As chair of the newly formed group, she explained the reason for the name: “…nature enthusiasts from Moosomin, Rocanville, and Redvers met in Moosomin to create Gateway Nature. The name symbolizes our general geographical location near the Manitoba border (the gateway to Saskatchewan) and how we aim to be a gateway through which the public enters into a love of the natural world”.

Kendra helped facilitate the inaugural meeting and started off by asking those in attendance what they would like to see as the focus for their newly created nature society. This group is off to a great start with amazing ideas and a positive energy. They agreed to focus on the following areas/objectives: 

  • Engaging community members of all ages in directly observing nature

  • Gathering data on local wildlife for use by researchers

  • Building bonds of friendship and fun among nature enthusiasts

  • Promoting eco-friendly practices among local residents

  • Encouraging landowners to explore easement options

  • Teaching ourselves and our neighbours about nature through lectures, videos, and pamphlets

During the meeting, using these 6 objectives as a guideline, this enthusiastic group of people decided on a list of activities and events to do in the next 12 months. How amazing is that! Their list of activities include hosting several nature walks and species identification expeditions in the Moosomin, Rocanville & Redvers areas. They also plan on promoting pollinator-friendly practices through the distribution of ‘Bee Friendly’ signs as well as the growing and distribution of native plants for area residents. Other ideas they discussed included birdwatching contests, fundraising events as well as targeted lectures, including their first event which will be held on February 29th at the Moosomin library to hear Dr. Cory Sheffield, from the Royal SK Museum, talk about bee conservation.

This was an impressive meeting amongst an equally impressive group of talented people. Gateway Nature has formally registered and been accepted as a local chapter/branch of Nature Saskatchewan. The group will be run by the following individuals: Chair - Kendra Parrish; Vice-Chair - Lana Shaw; Secretary/Webmaster - Coral Wiebe; Treasurer - Jody Blyth.

We wish them all the best and we look forward to seeing all the good things that will be completed by this new group.

Note:

The roll of the IHNHS committee members (Lorne Scott, Laura Poppy, Bruce Neill & Dora Nichols) at the inaugural Gateway Nature meeting was to offer support and answer questions for this newly formed neighbouring Nature group. The IHNHS has been an active nature society and local chapter of Nature SK since the early 1970’s. Even more special, one of the group’s original members and founders, Dora Nichols, was able to attend the Moosomin meeting to offer support and wisdom. Dora has consecutively served as the secretary for the IHNHS since its beginning! That’s over 50 years of service to nature and her local society! Also of interest, two of the IHNHS members in attendance at the Jan 18 meeting also serve on the board of Nature Sask:  Lorne Scott (president) and Laura Poppy (Vice) wore two hats while attending the meeting in Moosomin. 

By Laura Poppy 

(on behalf of the Indian Head Natural History Society & Nature Saskatchewan)

 

Interested in being part of Gateway Nature? You can contact them here.

 

 

Jan
16
Employment Opportunities - 2024

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Nature Saskatchewan has the following job opportunities. All positions are based in Regina, involve extensive travel in rural southern and central Saskatchewan, and start May 6th, 2024. General qualifications include a strong interest in conservation and environmental education, and studies in the fields of biology, ecology, geography, agriculture, or other related studies. Applicants should have strong communication, computer, and organizational skills; be self-motivated with the ability to work independently as well as part of a team; and hold a valid driver’s license (vehicle will be provided). Positions are heavily field-based so applicants must be willing to do extended, overnight travel and work flexible hours, including outdoors in inclement conditions. Applicants should also be able to hike to field sites carrying field equipment. Please note on your resume if you have First Aid and CPR certification.

Applications for all postings must be sent via email and will be accepted until 11:59 pm on February 15th, 2024. We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Selected applicants will be contacted via email.
 

Habitat Stewardship Summer Assistant

 

Positions: Two full-time summer positions for 16 weeks @ $18/hour. Summer assistants will assist in the delivery of our stewardship programs: Operation Burrowing Owl, Shrubs for Shrikes, Plovers on Shore and Stewards of Saskatchewan banner program. These programs promote conservation of prairie species at risk and their habitat.

Tasks and responsibilities: Assist program coordinators with program delivery; prepare communications and educational materials for distribution; assist in searches, monitoring and other conservation activities; contact and communicate with rural landholders regarding target species and the stewardship programs; educate targeted public audiences about species at risk on the prairies; and help create and deliver workshops and presentations to agricultural producers and the public (virtual and/or in-person).

Specific requirements and qualifications: Willingness to do extended overnight travel, camp, work evenings and weekends, and adapt to schedule and protocol changes on short notice. Should also possess basic wildlife and plant identification skills, computer skills, communication skills; and familiarity with GPS, maps, and rural Saskatchewan are assets.

Please email a cover letter and resume in one PDF file to Emily Putz at outreach@naturesask.ca by 11:59 pm, February 15th, 2024. Include in the subject line “Summer Assistant Application” followed by your name.

 

Rare Plant Rescue Habitat Stewardship Summer Assistant

 

Position: One full-time summer position for 16 weeks @ $18/hour. The summer assistant will assist in the delivery of our Rare Plant Rescue program. This program promotes conservation of prairie plant species at risk.

Tasks and responsibilities: Assist program coordinators with program delivery; prepare communications and educational materials for distribution; assist in planning and conducting searches, monitoring, and other conservation activities; contact and communicate with rural landholders regarding target species and the stewardship programs; enter data; educate targeted public audiences about species at risk on the prairies; and help create and deliver workshops and presentations to agricultural producers and the public (virtual and/or in-person).

Specific requirements and qualifications: Basic plant identification skills (training in rare plant identification will be provided); willing to work flexible hours outdoors including in inclement conditions; willing to adapt to changing schedules due to unexpected circumstances or adjustments based on field conditions; willing to do extended overnight travel; camp; work evenings and weekends; ability to hike to field sites carrying equipment; strong organizational skills; working knowledge with Excel; familiarity with GPS and maps is an asset.

Please email a cover letter and resume in one PDF file to Rebecca Magnus at rmagnus@naturesask.ca by 11:59 pm February 15th, 2024. Include in the subject line “RPR Summer Assistant Application” followed by your name.

 

Rare Plant Rescue Search and Monitoring Staff
 

Position(s): Four full-time summer staff for 16 weeks @ $20/hr. Search and monitoring staff will assist in the delivery of our Rare Plant Rescue program, which promotes the conservation of prairie plant species at risk. The search and monitoring staff will work as a semi-independent team, with daily check-ins during field shifts up to 10 days, under the supervision and mentorship of the project leader.

Tasks and responsibilities: Plan and conduct occupancy surveys and monitoring of prairie plant species at risk; contact and communicate with landowners regarding target species and the stewardship programs; data entry.

Specific requirements and  qualifications: Basic plant identification skills (training in rare plant identification will be provided); willing to work flexible hours outdoors including in inclement conditions; willing to adapt to changing schedules due to unexpected circumstances or adjustments based on field conditions; willing to do extended overnight travel; camp; work evenings and weekends; ability to hike to field sites carrying equipment; strong organizational skills; familiarity with GPS and maps is an asset.

 

Please email a resume and cover letter in one PDF file to Rebecca Magnus at rmagnus@naturesask.ca by 11:59 pm February 15th, 2024. Include in the subject line “RPR Search Crew Application” followed by your name.

 

For all positions, preference will be given to Canadian students or recent graduates whose studies include the fields of biology, ecology, geography, agriculture, or other related studies. All else being equal, preference will be given to those who self-identify in their cover letter as being part of an underrepresented group or as having additional barriers in the labour market, such as racialized and visible minorities, LGBTQ2 individuals, Indigenous individuals, women in STEM, or persons with disabilities.

 

Nature Saskatchewan is a non-government charitable organization that engages and inspires people to appreciate, learn about, and conserve Saskatchewan’s natural environment.

 

Dec
5
Come work with Nature Saskatchewan!

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Habitat Stewardship Coordinator
Application Deadline: January 2, 2024  

Location:         Regina, Saskatchewan
Start date:       January 22nd, 2024
Position:          Eight months full-time with the possibility of extension
Wage:             $4,407 / month

 

Nature Saskatchewan requires an enthusiastic individual to deliver our Rare Plant Rescue program. Initiated in 2002, the program raises awareness about rare plant species and engages landowners in conserving the plants’ unique habitats through voluntary agreements, educational programming, and landowner workshops. The coordinator will work under the supervision of the Species at Risk Manager, closely with other Nature Saskatchewan staff, and together with other agencies involved in complementary and related activities.

Click here for more information on Nature Saskatchewan and Rare Plant Rescue.

Tasks and responsibilities:

  • Plan and deliver program activities; work with other agencies with shared goals
  • Arrange and deliver on-site visits with current and potential program participants
  • Hire, train, and supervise five summer field staff
  • Plan and conduct searches and monitoring for target plant species throughout Southern Saskatchewan
  • Promote stewardship through printed materials, newsletter articles, displays, presentations, media releases, and stewardship workshops
  • Manage data, including mapping locational data
  • Prepare funding proposals and reports
  • Manage and monitor budgeted expenditures

Qualifications:

  • Post-secondary degree in biology, agriculture, natural resource management or other related environmental studies.
  • Experience hiring and supervising field staff
  • Experience in stewardship and/or wildlife work is an asset
  • Excellent communication and writing skills
  • Self-motivated, organizational skills, resourcefulness, and ability to plan project work
  • Valid driver’s license and willingness to work flexible hours at times

Please email a resume and a cover letter in one pdf by January 2nd, 2024 to Rebecca Magnus at rmagnus@naturesask.ca. Please include in the subject line “RPR Coordinator” and your name.

 

Sep
8
Call for article and photo submissions

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Nature Saskatchewan is looking for article and photo submissions for our Stewards of Saskatchewan (SOS) Newsletter and Species at Risk (SAR) Calendar!

The annual newsletter and calendar is sent out to all of our program participants (over 1100 land title holders and managing stewards) as well as our funders and partner organizations. The newsletter will also be available to the public through our website. It features updates on our programs and other topics related to SAR or land management. 

In general, we are interested in articles on:
- Recent research on wildlife (including plants!), especially SAR (e.g. from University students, etc.),
- Programs that our landholder participants may be interested in
- Grazing, production, livestock
- Research relevant to native prairie and grasslands
- Weed management
- Land management
- Invasive species
- Collaborative Conservation Projects

We are always looking for a way to connect and build relationships with our local, transboundary, and international partners, and love hearing how our SAR (such as Loggerhead Shrikes, Burrowing Owls, Piping Plovers, Sprague’s Pipits, Ferruginous Hawks, Monarchs, etc.) are doing in other parts of their range. Therefore, we would love to include interesting stories from other organizations, or current research and programming from within, as well as outside of Saskatchewan.

If you are a landholder, manager, or an SOS program participant and would like to write a perspective piece, we would love to feature your article! The topic can be anything that is important to you and that you feel other program stewards would have an interest in (e.g. your land management/business practices, your experiences with the programs, interesting species observations, etc.).

Article Guidelines:
- Must be between 250 and 500 words (1/2 to 1 page)
- Write at a level relevant for the general public (e.g. leave out scientific jargon)
- Focus on a topic relevant to landholders and producers, particularly those who have SAR on their land
- Provide a photo or two to go along with your article, include photographers and suggested captions

Calendar Photo Guidelines:

The calendar photos should be clear and high resolution (300 dpi minimum). As always, we welcome and appreciate any photos of SAR and are able to offer tax receipts for photos donated to Nature Saskatchewan that are used in a print publication. 

The species for consideration for the calendar this year are:

Insects

Western Bumble Bee
Dusky Dune Moth
Gold-edged Gem

Herpetiles & Fishes

Snapping Turtle
Bigmouth Buffalo

Plants

Tiny Cryptantha
Western Spiderwort
Plains Grape Fern
Upland Evening Primrose

Birds

Loggerhead Shrike
Burrowing Owl
Piping Plover
Sprague’s Pipit
Greater-sage Grouse
Rusty Blackbird
Canada Warbler

Please send Calendar photo submissions to Rebecca Magnus at rmagnus@naturesask.ca and article submissions (with accompanying photos) to Ashley Vass at rpr@naturesask.ca by Friday, October 6th, 2023. We will be happy to provide a copy of the printed newsletter and/or calendar to those whose photos/articles are included. If there is an article that you would like to submit but are unsure of whether it is relevant, don’t hesitate to email me! Please feel free to share this email with anyone you think may be interested and contact us with any questions you may have. 

Aug
22
Employment Opportunity - Habitat Stewardship Coordinator

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Habitat Stewardship Coordinator

Application Deadline: September 5th, 2023

Location: Regina, Saskatchewan
Start Date: October 2, 2023
Position: Full-time Permanent
Wage: $52,888 - $63,532 (plus benefits)

Nature Saskatchewan (NS) requires an enthusiastic and knowledgeable individual to develop and deliver our Operation Burrowing Owl (OBO) program. OBO (initiated in 1987) raises awareness about the Burrowing Owl, and engages landowners in conserving and enhancing their habitat through voluntary agreements, educational programming, and landowner workshops. Field work and travel are involved, primarily from May through August. The coordinator will work under the supervision of the Species at Risk Manager and closely with other Nature Saskatchewan Habitat Stewardship Coordinators, and together with other agencies involved in complementary and related activities (e.g., serving on committees). 


Tasks and responsibilities:

  • Plan and deliver program activities; work with other agencies with shared goals.
  • Hire, train, and supervise summer field staff.
  • Respond to Burrowing Owl sightings; search for new occurrences; visit landowners to verify occurrences of target species; invite landowners with Burrowing Owls to participate in our Stewards of Saskatchewan programs.
  • Promote stewardship through printed materials, newsletter articles, displays, presentations, media releases, and stewardship workshops.
  • Maintain accurate records of landowner and species occurrence information.
  • Prepare funding proposals (including budgets) and reports regarding these programs.


Qualifications:

  • Post-secondary degree in biology, agriculture, natural resource management or other related environmental studies. Experience in stewardship and/or wildlife work is an asset.
  • Excellent communication and writing skills.
  • Self-motivated, organizational skills, resourcefulness, and ability to plan project work.
  • Valid driver’s license and willingness to work flexible hours at times.

 

Please email a resume and cover letter in one pdf to Rebecca Magnus at rmagnus@naturesask.ca. Please include in the subject line “OBO Coordinator” and your name.

 

Nature Saskatchewan is a conservation and cultural organization that promotes the appreciation and understanding of our natural environment through education, conservation and research.

 

 

 
Aug
21
Flap to it, and Plant a Fall Garden for Monarchs!

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Regina, SK – August 21st, 2023 - As our summer gears up for the last warm days before Autumn settles in, so to do our prairie Monarch Butterflies gear up for their big migration south.

August is an eventful month for the Monarch on the prairies. Milkweed is in full bloom, starting to develop pods, and the last of this summers Monarch caterpillars are completing their metamorphosis into the beautiful iconic butterflies that we all love. This month watchful eyes can be lucky enough to catch Monarchs in all forms of their life stages, and it is one of the best times to give Monarchs a helping hand in the garden. “Migration takes an enormous amount of energy,” Emily Putz, Habitat Stewardship Coordinator at Nature Saskatchewan explains, “The adults that emerge now are in a race to get the nutrients they need to survive the journey.” The summer generation of butterflies will survive up to 9 months, journeying 4,000km south to their wintering site in Mexico- where they fast throughout the winter before producing the next generation to begin the flight northward in the spring. Foraging before they begin their flight can give them the boost they need to get going. “That’s were the public can come in to help” further explains Putz, “lots of people know about the importance of Milkweed to a Monarch caterpillar, but it’s often forgotten that ample late-blooming nectaring species are equally important to the adults in late summer.” If you already have Milkweed incorporated into your yardscape, planting other nectaring plants completes the picture for the monarchs and will attract them to your Milkweed more readily.

Planting your garden with Monarchs in mind can create a habitat that blooms late into the fall season, while benefitting a huge number of our other native insect and bird species alike. When looking to which species to plant, perennial native plants will give Monarchs the energy they need. “These flowering species are already adapted to our climate, making them low-maintenance once established, there’s also the added benefit that our native pollinators are also adapted to their bloom times and know to look for them.” Putz states. The large yellow blooms of our goldenrod species produce right into the fall, as well as golden and purple native asters, purple vervain, and pink blazingstar. Planting these species creates an attractive landscape to insects and humans alike. Stay away from tropical species, especially Tropical Milkweed, which may be colourful and advertised as butterfly benefitting, but can do more harm then good to Monarchs, spreading wing deforming disease and tricking them into staying too long before the frost.

Saskatchewan’s Monarchs begin their flight Southward by the end of August into September. If you happen to spot one on its journey, or at anytime of its lifecycle, please report your sighting to Nature Saskatchewan’s toll-free HOOTline, 1-800-667-HOOT (4668) or email Emily Putz at outreach@naturesask.ca. Every sighting helps fill the knowledge gap of this iconic butterfly in it’s prairie range.

If you have Monarch habitat with consistent use year to year by this butterfly, consider joining Nature Saskatchewan’s voluntary stewardship program, Stewards of Saskatchewan, which currently partners with 274 private land title holders and managers to help conserve habitat and monitor population numbers of monarchs and other species-at-risk in the province. All Caller and program participant information is kept confidential.

 

For further information, please contact Nature Saskatchewan:

Emily PutzHabitat Stewardship Coordinator
Phone: (306) 780-9832
Email: outreach@naturesask.ca

Rebecca Magnus, Species at Risk Manager
Phone: (306) 780-9270
Email: rmagnus@naturesask.ca

 

Jul
27
Conservation Awareness and Appreciation Supper

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Join Nature Saskatchewan for a Conservation Awareness and Appreciation Supper at the Rodeo Ranch Museum in Wood Mountain Regional Park on Thursday August 10, 2023
 

Featuring presentations from:

  • Nature Saskatchewan
  • Rodeo Ranch Museum
  • SK Falconry Association with a LIVE falcon!

There will be a FREE supper catered by the Wood Mountain Historical Society
 

Please RSVP by July 31 by email to obo@naturesask.ca or text/call 306-780-9833

Jul
18
Summer is flying by and so are young Burrowing Owls!

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Regina, SK – July 18th, 2023 – As we make our way into summer on the prairies, mid to late July marks the end of a busy nesting season for the endangered Burrowing Owls. Right now, young Burrowing Owls are beginning to discover their independence as they start to leave the comfort of the nest and learn to hunt for themselves! While this is an exciting time in their life cycle, it does not come without risks. One of the many dangers a young and inexperienced Burrowing Owl can face is collision with vehicles. Kaytlyn Burrows, Habitat Stewardship Coordinator at Nature Saskatchewan explains that “the juveniles often forage in roadside ditches, where they find small invertebrates and rodents that tend to congregate at dusk, but unfortunately, many of these young are killed by motorists whilst foraging along the sun-warmed road.”

The Burrowing Owl population faced a steep decline in the early 1990’s and has not been able to recover, making the survival of each juvenile owl incredibly important for the growth of their population. There are some things that we can do to help the young owls survive during this critical time. “When motorists are driving in Burrowing Owl habitat, and especially near known nest sites, it’s important that they take a few extra minutes and slow down. This will reduce the risk of owl-vehicle collisions.” The owls can be found in native or tame pasture that has been well grazed by cattle, as this shorter grass allows them to spot predators. They can also be seen standing on or nearby the burrow, on nearby fence posts, or foraging in the ditches.

Slowing down while driving will not only help Burrowing Owls survive, but may also increase your chances of spotting this endangered bird! A few key features to remember when identifying a Burrowing Owl are their mottled brown and white feathers, round head, white ‘eyebrows’, and long featherless legs. Don’t be fooled by its small size – they are only about 9 inches tall (about the size of a Robin).

Nature Saskatchewan runs a voluntary stewardship program, Operation Burrowing Owl, and currently partners with 350 private land title holders and managers to help conserve habitat and monitor population numbers. Program participants are the eyes and ears and help us by recording sightings to help determine population trends and distribution of the Burrowing Owl throughout Saskatchewan. This information is helpful towards the conservation of these charismatic birds.

If you think you have spotted a Burrowing Owl, please give a “hoot” by calling Nature Saskatchewan’s toll-free HOOT Line, 1-800-667-HOOT (4668) or email obo@naturesask.ca. “When you report a sighting you are playing a very important role in Burrowing Owl recovery. Every sighting is critical!” says Burrows. Caller information is kept confidential.

For further information, please contact Nature Saskatchewan:

Kaytlyn Burrows,Habitat Stewardship Coordinator
Phone: (306) 780-9833
Email: obo@naturesask.ca       
 

Rebecca Magnus, Species at Risk Manager
Phone: (306) 780-9270
Email: rmagnus@naturesask.ca

 

 

Young Burrowing Owls, photo: Boyd Coburn

 

 

 

 

Jun
26
From Shorelines to Shelterbelts, Families are Out and About!

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Regina, SK – June 26, 2023 – The beginning of July means the start of summer for many families, as school is out and family road trips and sunny days on the beach begin. The same can be said for Saskatchewan’s wild families! This time of year our bird species are especially active as they raise their chicks, including two bird species at risk- the Endangered Piping Plover and the Threatened Loggerhead Shrike. Nature Saskatchewan is asking families and the public to keep a watch out for these birds and report any sightings to help monitor their populations.

Along the shorelines you’ll find the Piping Plover - a small, white and tan-coloured shorebird that nests on rocky and sandy beaches below the vegetation line, and forages along the shoreline for their invertebrate prey. Their nests are shallow depressions within the sand that they line with pebbles, relying heavily on camouflage to protect the eggs from predators. Adults and chicks rely on staying still and blending in to stay safe, which makes them very difficult to spot until it’s too late. “Sandy, open beaches provide the best habitat for nesting and foraging,” explains Emily Putz, Habitat Stewardship Coordinator at Nature Saskatchewan. “Unfortunately these types of beaches are also the most attractive to humans as well for our recreation activities. We ask the public to be mindful of this as they explore Saskatchewan’s shorelines this summer.”

While most chicks have already hatched, some late nesters may still be incubating eggs. The public is asked to keep dogs on a leash and keep ATVs off the open sand in areas where plovers are known to nest in high numbers, such as Lake Diefenbaker and the shoreline of the South Saskatchewan River. Chicks will remain motionless when they sense danger, while adult plovers will perform a “broken-wing” display, as well as make vocal “peep-lo” calls, whenever their nest is approached by people or predators. If a plover is trying to lead you away from the nest, be careful of where you’re stepping!

Loggerhead Shrikes, meanwhile, can be found busy feeding their noisy chicks in thorny shrubs like buffaloberry in shelterbelts, which provide great opportunities to “impale” their prey. Also known as butcherbirds, Shrikes – which are great for pest control – are known to impale amphibians, insects like grasshoppers, and small rodents like mice on thorns, branches, or barb wire! The chicks are just beginning to explore outside of their nest in July, often following their parents to practice their hunting skills, perching on or near roadsides which are perfect places to grab insect food from. “Because of this, roadside mortality is a major threat to their population, particularly the young fledglings who are unable to fly away from an oncoming vehicle,” explains Emily Putz. “If you are hitting the roads this summer, watch for young birds on roads, particularly near shelterbelts or shrubby yard sites.” Loggerhead Shrikes are slightly smaller than a robin, and can be identified by the band of black that runs across their faces, with grey backs and wings that flash white when in flight.

Saskatchewan provides important breeding habitat for both Piping Plovers and Loggerhead Shrikes, and with the largest population of Piping Plovers in Canada, “It’s up to us to do what we can to help their chicks survive to adulthood,” concludes Putz.

Nature Saskatchewan’s voluntary stewardship programs, Shrubs for Shrikes and Plovers on Shore, work directly with land stewards to conserve habitat for species-at-risk and monitor population numbers in Saskatchewan. Sightings are recorded to help determine the distribution of these species throughout the province. This information can then be used towards efforts to conserve and restore the habitat and population of these species. Anyone can report their sightings of these species as they are out this summer enjoying Saskatchewan’s natural beauty. If you see any of these species in Saskatchewan or would like more information about our programs, please call Nature Saskatchewan’s toll-free line at 1-800-667-HOOT (4668), text (306) 780-9832, or email us at outreach@naturesask.ca. Private information is never shared without permission. Please also feel free to share photos, as we love to see them!

 

For further information, please contact Nature Saskatchewan:

 

Emily Putz, Habitat Stewardship Coordinator
Cell Phone: (306) 780-9832
Email: ooutreach@naturesask.ca

           

Rebecca Magnus, Species at Risk Manager
Phone: (306) 780-9270
Email: rmagnus@naturesask.ca

 

Photo credits: top left, Sarah Vinge-Mazer, top right: Val Thomas, bottom left: Emily Putz, bottom right: Arnold Janz