Bird Friendly Regina

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With Regina's designation as a certified Bird Friendly City, there is a strong focus to make our city a safe haven for wild birds. The Bird-Friendly City campaign is an initiative started by Nature Canada. Bird Friendly Cities work towards creating safer urban environments for birds by focusing on three main aspects: reducing threats to birds, restoring habitat and natural spaces, and educating and mobilizing the public.

Contact us: birdfriendlyregina@gmail.com
Keep posted on our activities through our Facebook Page

 
 
 

 

A Bird Friendly City is a community where:

  • Key threats to birds are effectively mitigated;
  • Nature is restored so native bird populations can thrive;
  • Residents are actively engaged in admiring and monitoring local bird populations;
  • Organizations are creating events to protect birds;
  • Progressive municipal policies are created to protect urban bird populations; and
  • A Bird Team has been created to oversee and lead these initiatives.

 

Birds play an essential role in maintaining healthy and resilient ecosystems in our communities and our planet. But Canada’s birds need your help. There are three billion fewer birds in North America today than 50 years ago. Much of these losses are caused by preventable human activities including: window collisions, predation by outdoor pets, habitat loss and degradation due to urban sprawl and development, and light pollution to name a few.
 

Preventing Window Collisions

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Did you know that 25 million birds in Canada die annually from collisions with glass? And it’s not just high-rises that kill birds. In fact, over 90% of collisions are caused by residential homes and low-rise buildings.

 

What we can do:

  • Looking for ways to prevent window strikes? Feather Friendly Window Markers is one of the most effective and affordable solutions. If you’re in Regina, you can contact Nature Regina directly or order anywhere in Canada here: www.featherfriendly.com/residential.
  • If a bird has collided with a window, it has likely suffered severe head trauma which can lead to brain swelling. The sooner you get the bird to a Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre for treatment, the better chance it has for recovery. In Regina, contact Salthaven West Wildlife Rehabilitation at 639-999-4957.

 

Keep Cats and Wildlife Safe

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Each year in Canada, cats kill between 100-350 million birds. This accounts for up to 75% of all bird deaths in Canada. Feral and owned cats pose a huge risk for migratory birds in our communities. Through education, policy and bylaw enforcement, cities can become a safer place for birds and cats alike.

 

We can keep cats and wildlife safe by:

  • Simple measures such as keeping cat indoors, supervising cats on a leash, or building an outdoor catio will save wildlife & ensure cats are safe from becoming lost, being struck by a vehicle, or eating something that could make them sick.
  • Any wildlife that has been caught by a cat needs medical attention. Contact your local Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre immediately. In Regina, contact Salthaven West Wildlife Rehabilitation at 639-999-4957.
  • To review current pet bylaws for the City of Regina please click here.

 

Dim the Lights for Birds at Night

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Every year, billions of birds migrate in the spring and fall, the majority of them flying at night, navigating by moonlight and starlight. Artificial light can cause them to wander off course and toward the dangerous nighttime landscapes of cities. Millions of birds die colliding with needlessly illuminated buildings and towers.
 

What we can do:

There are many things we can all do to reduce artificial light at night including: turning off exterior decorative lighting, extinguishing pot and flood-lights, install automatic motion sensors and controls wherever possible, down-shield exterior lighting to eliminate horizontal glare and all light directed upward, to name a few.

Events and Citizen Science

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In the News

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Bird Friendly City Partner Organizations

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